The Important Guidelines You Must Know On Rabbit Shelter Requirements

By | June 6, 2016

Rabbits require somewhere so they can eat, sleep, hide, and make a toilet, plus space to hop, run, play, jump, and dig. To give enough space for any this, the minimum recommended size for the living space, e. g. hutch or cage, is 12 sq ft (1. 1 block meters), for example 6’x2′ (1. 8mx0. 6m), with the addition of a bigger area (32 sq. foot. ) for exercise. This is merely the minimum though; make it a must to give your bunny as much space as you can.

Shelter Space – Minimum 12 sq. ft

Your rabbit’s living area should include an surrounded sleeping area, space for a litter tray and feed/water bowls and room to move about and have a few toys. It is important that your rabbit has the room to move in all directions. rabbits farm in your own backyard A living space that’s too small can affect your rabbit’s health – leading to spine problems, muscle wastage and unhealthy weight.
Rabbit Hutch Width

A relaxed rabbit will totally stretch out when relaxing, so that your rabbit hutch/cage should be wide enough to allow you rabbit to lie with its thighs stretched. This also enables plenty of room to turn around.

A minimum size of 2′ (60cm) is recommended for small to medium sized rabbits and 3′ (90cm) for large to giant breeds.
Bunny Hutch Length

The hutch should be long enough for your rabbit to take at least 3-4 hops without bumping its nose on the end. A medium sized rabbit covers about 18″ (45cm) with each hop – see me personally measuring/photographing my rabbit Scamp hoping here.

Bear in mind the total floor area too, if your hutch is 2′ wide, the size would need to need to be 6′ to make 12 sq. ft. total.
Have a Hutch Height

Rabbits stand up on their back legs to check their environment is safe, and your rabbit’s hutch/cage should be tall enough to allow this without your rabbit being hunched over or clam shel its ears resistant to the roof structure.

A height of 2′ (60cm) is usually satisfactory for small rabbits but large breeds may require nearer to 3′ (90cm). It’s okay if some areas, for example tunnels or sleeping boxes are lower as long as the majority of the space contains large amount height.

View Stockists/Hutch Builders Offering 6ft Hutches
Run/Exercise Space – Least 32 sq. ft.

The minimum recommended exercise space is 32 square foot (e. g. 8’x4′). Because with the liveable space, your rabbit will need to be able to stand up fully. Although not mandatory, it also helps to add and take note height to allow for jumping and for objects to stand jump/stand on. You might like to consider your own height too – to be able to comfortably walk inside your rabbits exercise area can make interacting with your rabbit easier.

Linking Living & Exercise Space

Essentially you’d provide the living and exercise space as one large area, or two areas your rabbit can move between freely, for example a cage attached to a pen or a hutch linked with a canal or ramp to a secure exercise run.

Remember rabbits are most active in the early mornings and past due evenings and may become frustrated if confined to a smaller living area when they most want to be running and playing.

Recommended Hutch/Cage Sizes

These suggestions for accommodation size are based on The Rabbit Code of Practice for the pet Welfare Act 2006 which states:

The living area should be as large as possible. At least:

– big enough for your rabbit to lie down and extend comfortably in all directions;
– be high enough for it to fully stand up on their back legs without its ears touching the top; and
– be long enough so that it can move around, feed and drink. Being a guide, your rabbit must be able to take 3 hops from end to another as a minimal.

Your rabbit should have daily access to a run where it can run and jump. The run should be as large as possible to allow your rabbit to stretch up wards to full height also to run, as opposed to just hop.

Rabbit Smell Control

Though rabbits can make great pets, they can also cause a huge stink – virtually. Thankfully, most of the causes are easily solved, as most are related to cage hygiene alternatively than the rabbit itself. Here are a few ways to help reduce the odor caused by a pet rabbit.

Recommendations

1. Thoroughly rinse your litter box box when changing the rabbit’s litter, and wash the area around the box steps to start raising rabbits as well, for any stray urine. Build-up of urine can quickly begin to smell, making the rabbit’s living environment unpleasant for human and rabbit likewise.

2. Spay or castrate your pet rabbit. Spaying or neutering will help reduce odor, in addition to imparting a host of other potential health benefits.

3. Buy products specially formulated to lessen pet rabbit scent. Some additives can be sprinkled into litter which will help reduce smell. Others are added to the rabbit’s water to reduce the smell from the inside.

4. Groom the bunnie occasionally, particularly while losing or when soiled with food or waste.

5. Wash cage accessories at least once a week, and wipe them off when soiled. Clean and dry out the complete cage once each month to maintain sufficient cleanliness.

6. If your rabbit has excessively foul feces or urine, or appears to be eliminating waste more frequently than normal, a visit to the vet’s office may be in order.

Tips & Warnings

– Change your rabbit’s litter every day to help reduce odor.

– Ensure any products purchased are formulated for rabbits, and not other small pets, which may have different requirements.Rabbits require somewhere so they can eat, sleep, hide, and make a toilet, plus space to hop, run, play, jump, and dig. To give enough space for any this, the minimum recommended size for the living space, e. g. hutch or cage, is 12 sq ft (1. 1 block meters), for example 6’x2′ (1. 8mx0. 6m), with the addition of a bigger area (32 sq. foot. ) for exercise. This is merely the minimum though; make it a must to give your bunny as much space as you can.

Shelter Space – Minimum 12 sq. ft

Your rabbit’s living area should include an surrounded sleeping area, space for a litter tray and feed/water bowls and room to move about and have a few toys. It is important that your rabbit has the room to move in all directions. rabbits farm in your own backyard A living space that’s too small can affect your rabbit’s health – leading to spine problems, muscle wastage and unhealthy weight.
Rabbit Hutch Width

A relaxed rabbit will totally stretch out when relaxing, so that your rabbit hutch/cage should be wide enough to allow you rabbit to lie with its thighs stretched. This also enables plenty of room to turn around.

A minimum size of 2′ (60cm) is recommended for small to medium sized rabbits and 3′ (90cm) for large to giant breeds.
Bunny Hutch Length

The hutch should be long enough for your rabbit to take at least 3-4 hops without bumping its nose on the end. A medium sized rabbit covers about 18″ (45cm) with each hop – see me personally measuring/photographing my rabbit Scamp hoping here.

Bear in mind the total floor area too, if your hutch is 2′ wide, the size would need to need to be 6′ to make 12 sq. ft. total.
Have a Hutch Height

Rabbits stand up on their back legs to check their environment is safe, and your rabbit’s hutch/cage should be tall enough to allow this without your rabbit being hunched over or clam shel its ears resistant to the roof structure.

A height of 2′ (60cm) is usually satisfactory for small rabbits but large breeds may require nearer to 3′ (90cm). It’s okay if some areas, for example tunnels or sleeping boxes are lower as long as the majority of the space contains large amount height.

View Stockists/Hutch Builders Offering 6ft Hutches
Run/Exercise Space – Least 32 sq. ft.

The minimum recommended exercise space is 32 square foot (e. g. 8’x4′). Because with the liveable space, your rabbit will need to be able to stand up fully. Although not mandatory, it also helps to add and take note height to allow for jumping and for objects to stand jump/stand on. You might like to consider your own height too – to be able to comfortably walk inside your rabbits exercise area can make interacting with your rabbit easier.

Linking Living & Exercise Space

Essentially you’d provide the living and exercise space as one large area, or two areas your rabbit can move between freely, for example a cage attached to a pen or a hutch linked with a canal or ramp to a secure exercise run.

Remember rabbits are most active in the early mornings and past due evenings and may become frustrated if confined to a smaller living area when they most want to be running and playing.

Recommended Hutch/Cage Sizes

These suggestions for accommodation size are based on The Rabbit Code of Practice for the pet Welfare Act 2006 which states:

The living area should be as large as possible. At least:

– big enough for your rabbit to lie down and extend comfortably in all directions;
– be high enough for it to fully stand up on their back legs without its ears touching the top; and
– be long enough so that it can move around, feed and drink. Being a guide, your rabbit must be able to take 3 hops from end to another as a minimal.

Your rabbit should have daily access to a run where it can run and jump. The run should be as large as possible to allow your rabbit to stretch up wards to full height also to run, as opposed to just hop.

Rabbit Smell Control

Though rabbits can make great pets, they can also cause a huge stink – virtually. Thankfully, most of the causes are easily solved, as most are related to cage hygiene alternatively than the rabbit itself. Here are a few ways to help reduce the odor caused by a pet rabbit.

Recommendations

1. Thoroughly rinse your litter box box when changing the rabbit’s litter, and wash the area around the box steps to start raising rabbits as well, for any stray urine. Build-up of urine can quickly begin to smell, making the rabbit’s living environment unpleasant for human and rabbit likewise.

2. Spay or castrate your pet rabbit. Spaying or neutering will help reduce odor, in addition to imparting a host of other potential health benefits.

3. Buy products specially formulated to lessen pet rabbit scent. Some additives can be sprinkled into litter which will help reduce smell. Others are added to the rabbit’s water to reduce the smell from the inside.

4. Groom the bunnie occasionally, particularly while losing or when soiled with food or waste.

5. Wash cage accessories at least once a week, and wipe them off when soiled. Clean and dry out the complete cage once each month to maintain sufficient cleanliness.

6. If your rabbit has excessively foul feces or urine, or appears to be eliminating waste more frequently than normal, a visit to the vet’s office may be in order.

Tips & Warnings

– Change your rabbit’s litter every day to help reduce odor.

– Ensure any products purchased are formulated for rabbits, and not other small pets, which may have different requirements.

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