Beginners Guide To Keeping Turkeys For Meat And Egg Production In Your Livestock Farm

By | June 6, 2016

If you’re keeping turkeys for various meats, there are several various strains to choose from. The most popular are Broad-Breasted Whites and Broad-Breasted Bronzes.

The two of these strains of turkey are noted for their abundance of breast meats compared to commercially cultivated turkeys. You can buy turkeys from either a catalog and have them shipped, or, if you live in a rural area, you probably have a well-known co-op or give food to store that sells chicks.

Generally you start away with very young girls – about a day or two old – and after twenty to twenty-eight weeks, they are prepared to slaughter. Since it takes about this long to raise a dozens of turkeys, you should consider raising another flock about a month behind your first flock so that you have an ongoing turkey harvest.

You may sell the birds through maqui berry farmers markets, or you can talk to local facilities turkey farming for profits that offer weekly packages of milk and vegetables. You can also sell to neighbors or others in your community. If you stay in a rural area, you can always find people willing to buy fresh homegrown meat over store-bought meat.

Egg Development

The number of ova per hen produced in a season will depend on the breeding as well as on climatic conditions and management, includ- ing the use of artificial light. With no artifi- cial light in the northern tier of States, well- matured young turkey hens of the better laying strains should average about 40 ova to June 1, and hens in their second laying season about 40 eggs, provided broodiness is dis- couraged promptly.

In the middle States, these well-matured young turkey hens should lay about 40 eggs to June one particular, and the southern tier of States, about 60 eggs. With sufficient man-made light starting December 1, these hens should average about 100 eggs to the following June 1, or 160 to October 1. The poorer laying strains usually average only about 75 percent as many eggs as the better strains. Young hens come into 40-percent production 20 to 30 days (average 25) after stimulatory light- ing starts.

The number of eggs per capon produced in a season is determined by the breeding in addition , on climatic conditions and management, includ- ing the use of artificial light.

With no artifi- cial light in the northern tier of States, well- matured young turkey hens of the better laying strains should average about 40 ova to June 1, and hens in their second laying season about 30 eggs, provided broodiness is dis- couraged promptly. On the middle States, these well-matured young turkey chickens should lay about 50 eggs to June one particular, and in the the southern area of tier of States, about 60 eggs.

With adequate artificial light starting January 1, these hens should average about 100 ovum to the following June 1, or 160 to October 1 ) The lesser laying strains usually average only about 75 percent as many eggs as the better strains. Young hens come into 40-percent production 20 to 30 days (average 25) after stimulatory light- ing starts. The Midget Whites, Beltsville Whites and Bronze birds are good for egg production.

Egg Characteristics

Except after a long laying period, typical tur- key eggs vary on the whole overall color from light to medium dark brown and are well sprinkled with medium- to dark-brown spots superimposed over a light, yellowish-brown (ec- ru) ground color.

The shell normally is strong, with the shell walls very tough and the yolk quite firm but enclosed by a weak vitelline membrane. In shape the eggs are noticeably pointed at one end. As the egg-laying season progresses and production is heavy, shell texture may deterio- rate and the shell usually becomes lighter, sometimes almost white, with inconspicuous spotting or none at all.

Although these changes usually can be viewed as normal, the occur- rence of many light-colored, thin shells suggests disease involvement. In cases like this an in- vestigation is at order and the irregular eggs should not be used for hatching. Typical turkey eggs not needed for hatching can be used as human food for they are as palatable and nutritious as chicken eggs. They sometimes are broken and the contents frozen.

First-year ovum of the large broad-breasted bronze or white varieties weigh about 38 ounces per dozen, or 3. 167 ounces (90 grams) each; raise turkeys for meat those of the medium-size standard varieties, 36 ounces per dozen, or 3 ounces (85 grams) each; and those of the standard Beltsville Small White-colored, about 32 ounces per dozen, or 2. 667 ounces (75. 6 grams) each. Yearling hens place eggs averaging about 7 percent heavier than those of the identical hens in the first laying sea- boy.

Lumpy shells are not uncommon and if the shell itself is not fragile or thin, the lumps do not affect hatchability. If young hens are well matured, 34 to 35 weeks or more mature when laying starts, their first eggs are almost as large as they will be at any time during their first laying season. However, if brought into production while physically immature, turkey chickens lay only a few small eggs, which increase in size quite slowly and gradually and never become normal in proportions.If you’re keeping turkeys for various meats, there are several various strains to choose from. The most popular are Broad-Breasted Whites and Broad-Breasted Bronzes.

The two of these strains of turkey are noted for their abundance of breast meats compared to commercially cultivated turkeys. You can buy turkeys from either a catalog and have them shipped, or, if you live in a rural area, you probably have a well-known co-op or give food to store that sells chicks.

Generally you start away with very young girls – about a day or two old – and after twenty to twenty-eight weeks, they are prepared to slaughter. Since it takes about this long to raise a dozens of turkeys, you should consider raising another flock about a month behind your first flock so that you have an ongoing turkey harvest.

You may sell the birds through maqui berry farmers markets, or you can talk to local facilities turkey farming for profits that offer weekly packages of milk and vegetables. You can also sell to neighbors or others in your community. If you stay in a rural area, you can always find people willing to buy fresh homegrown meat over store-bought meat.

Egg Development

The number of ova per hen produced in a season will depend on the breeding as well as on climatic conditions and management, includ- ing the use of artificial light. With no artifi- cial light in the northern tier of States, well- matured young turkey hens of the better laying strains should average about 40 ova to June 1, and hens in their second laying season about 40 eggs, provided broodiness is dis- couraged promptly.

In the middle States, these well-matured young turkey hens should lay about 40 eggs to June one particular, and the southern tier of States, about 60 eggs. With sufficient man-made light starting December 1, these hens should average about 100 eggs to the following June 1, or 160 to October 1. The poorer laying strains usually average only about 75 percent as many eggs as the better strains. Young hens come into 40-percent production 20 to 30 days (average 25) after stimulatory light- ing starts.

The number of eggs per capon produced in a season is determined by the breeding in addition , on climatic conditions and management, includ- ing the use of artificial light.

With no artifi- cial light in the northern tier of States, well- matured young turkey hens of the better laying strains should average about 40 ova to June 1, and hens in their second laying season about 30 eggs, provided broodiness is dis- couraged promptly. On the middle States, these well-matured young turkey chickens should lay about 50 eggs to June one particular, and in the the southern area of tier of States, about 60 eggs.

With adequate artificial light starting January 1, these hens should average about 100 ovum to the following June 1, or 160 to October 1 ) The lesser laying strains usually average only about 75 percent as many eggs as the better strains. Young hens come into 40-percent production 20 to 30 days (average 25) after stimulatory light- ing starts. The Midget Whites, Beltsville Whites and Bronze birds are good for egg production.

Egg Characteristics

Except after a long laying period, typical tur- key eggs vary on the whole overall color from light to medium dark brown and are well sprinkled with medium- to dark-brown spots superimposed over a light, yellowish-brown (ec- ru) ground color.

The shell normally is strong, with the shell walls very tough and the yolk quite firm but enclosed by a weak vitelline membrane. In shape the eggs are noticeably pointed at one end. As the egg-laying season progresses and production is heavy, shell texture may deterio- rate and the shell usually becomes lighter, sometimes almost white, with inconspicuous spotting or none at all.

Although these changes usually can be viewed as normal, the occur- rence of many light-colored, thin shells suggests disease involvement. In cases like this an in- vestigation is at order and the irregular eggs should not be used for hatching. Typical turkey eggs not needed for hatching can be used as human food for they are as palatable and nutritious as chicken eggs. They sometimes are broken and the contents frozen.

First-year ovum of the large broad-breasted bronze or white varieties weigh about 38 ounces per dozen, or 3. 167 ounces (90 grams) each; raise turkeys for meat those of the medium-size standard varieties, 36 ounces per dozen, or 3 ounces (85 grams) each; and those of the standard Beltsville Small White-colored, about 32 ounces per dozen, or 2. 667 ounces (75. 6 grams) each. Yearling hens place eggs averaging about 7 percent heavier than those of the identical hens in the first laying sea- boy.

Lumpy shells are not uncommon and if the shell itself is not fragile or thin, the lumps do not affect hatchability. If young hens are well matured, 34 to 35 weeks or more mature when laying starts, their first eggs are almost as large as they will be at any time during their first laying season. However, if brought into production while physically immature, turkey chickens lay only a few small eggs, which increase in size quite slowly and gradually and never become normal in proportions.

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